September 15, 2017

Tara and Michael

Elopement

Winter at Dunton Hot Springs is one of the most incredible and ethereal ways to experience the Rockies. While most people hang out on the Eastern Slope, spending their time skiing, there is a quiet, gentle undercurrent that rises up from within the mountains themselves. When you step away from the crowded mountain towns and into the true Wild of Colorado, you find something incredibly different. A calming, timid silence. It smells strongly of wooden campfires and sounds like the crunch of snow beneath your boots. Like the cold air, it lingers in your lungs and like the warm fire you sit next to, it smolders in your soul. There is a sense of profound wonder that Winter brings in Colorado. The silent call to stop working, to rest, to play, to walk alone in the woods, and to make time for warmth of friendships and relationships.

There is a certain aura of Dunton Hot Springs that embodies this ethereal winter magic. It’s tucked remotely into the woods of the Western Slope, and if you’re not careful, you could just as easily miss it. It’s an oasis in the Desert of Snow, and a reprieve for those wishing to see another side of Colorado. On the morning of Tara and Michael’s wedding, I could see horses running wild at some of the nearby ranches, having escaped their stables and plunging into the snow. It was as if they sensed it too—the urge to embrace the cold, quiet of Winter.

Although winter weddings don’t seem to be the norm in Colorado due to the wild unpredictability of the Mountains, it’s always a joy for me to be able to participate in them as they bring a whole other sense of depth to weddings. I think it’s that exact idea—the unpredictability of it all—the thing that drives people away—that draws me into them. It can be easy to overlook the beauty that lies in the harshness of the landscape, and the chill of the night. But it is these things, these wild contrasts, that make them that much more cherished by me.

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Florals by the wonderful Prema Style

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